Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints In

Historic Masonry Finishes

Historic Masonry Finishes. ... On March 28, 1925, William Sumner Appleton, founder of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England), wrote to the architectural firm of Densmore, ... Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings.

crushed brushed stone note

Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry ... Masonry—brick, stone, terra-cotta, and concrete block—is found on nearly .... whereby a sample of the mortar is crushed and then mixed with a dilute acid. ..... Note that each type of work—brick repointing, stone repointing, or similar ....

Repointing / Tuckpointing / Mortar Joint Repair – Mid

Repointing / Tuckpointing / Mortar Joint Repair . The National Park Service’s Preservation Brief #2, titled Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings, defines Repointing, also known simply as "pointing“ or – somewhat inaccurately – "tuck pointing", as the process of removing deteriorated mortar from the joints of a masonry wall and replacing it with new mortar.”

Tuckpointing*, Re-pointing, Brick Pointing, Spot Pointing

Improperly done, re-pointing not only detracts from the appearance of the building, but may also cause physical damage to the masonry units themselves. *Tuckpointing technically describes a primarily decorative application of a raised mortar joint or lime putty joint on top of flush mortar joints.-Quoted from Preservation Brief #2

Society for the Preservation of Historic Cements

Preservation Brief #2, Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings (National Park Service, Department of the Interior, Washington D.C., 1976, revised 1980 and 1998) focuses attention on design choices for replacement mortar but the latest edition does not fully account for all the current binder choices in the market place e.g ...

PROGRAM COMMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REHABILITATION

Removal of Mortar Joints and Repointing 04100.01 - 2 A. Repointing shall conform to The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties with Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating, Restoring & Reconstructing Historic Buildings, available at the National Park Service (NPS) website at

However, removing hard mortar can cause more damage to the

Preservation Briefs 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Brick Buildings. In fact, a hard, dense mortar can accelerate deterioration of the masonry. It tends to shrink when drying, causing hairline cracks between it and the masonry where moisture can penetrate.

INTRODUCTION TYPES OF WOOD SIDING - Fort Worth, Texas

seal at the siding joints. The trim provides weather proofing to the interior wall system and decreases water intrusion. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES NPS Preservation Brief #2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings NPS Preservation Brief #6: Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings

Repointing Mortar - Virginia Department of Historic Resources

on this subject that discusses identifying the problem, various joint types and bondings, materials, and a bibliography for additional reading. Ask for "Preservation Brief No. 2 – Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Brick Buildings" available here at the department or by clicking here.

[PDF] Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings

The brief should serve as a guide to prepare specifications for repointing historic masonry. It should also help develop sensitivity to the particular needs of historic masonry, and to assist historic building owners in working cooperatively with architects, architectural conservators and historic preservation consultants, and contractors.

mortar Archives

Keep in mind this is a vast generalization, as building materials and climates differ. For more detailed information about selecting mortar for use on historic buildings, check out the National Park Service’s Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings.

Tech Brief Repointing Masonry Walls

weather resistant mortar joints that match the appearances of the original mortar joints, and helps extend the commercial life of the building. When properly done, repointing provides strong, weather resistant mortar joints and helps extend the commercial life of the building.

Alabama’s Historic Cemeteries: A Basic Guide to Preservation

A Gravestone Preservation Primer by Lynette Strangstad NPS Preservation Brief #1: Cleaning Historic Masonry available from the AHC or at www.cr.nps.gov NPS Preservation Brief #2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings, available from the AHC or www.cr.nps.gov

Capitol Hill Restoration Society » Repointing Mortar

To repoint, or not to repoint: that is the question! Mortar may be the most over-looked and under-appreciated aspect of your row house. Architectural conservator Justine Posluszny Bello discussed mortar and repointing fundamentals for the Capitol Hill homeowner at a Preservation Café, Thursday, April 21, 2016, at Ebenezers Coffeehouse.

4specs Discussion Forum: Pointing, repointing

(2) The material with which joints in masonry are finished. Repointing: See pointing. Tuck Pointing (also called Tuck and Pat Pointing): A method of refinishing old mortar joints. The loose mortar is dug out and the tuck is filled with fine mortar which is left projecting slightly or with a fillet of putty or lime.

www.angelfire.com

From NPS's Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings. Mortar Type and Mix. Mortars for repointing projects, especially those involving historic buildings, typically are custom mixed in order to ensure the proper physical and visual qualities.

Preservation Briefs

2. Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Brick Buildings 3. Conserving Energy in Historic Buildings 4. Roofing for Historic Buildings 5. Preservation of Historic Adobe Buildings 6. Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning of Historic Buildings 7. The Preservation of Historic Glazed Architectural Terra-Cotta 8.

Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic

This publication updates Preservation Briefs 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Brick Buildings to include all types of historic unit masonry. The scope of the earlier Brief has also been expanded to acknowledge that the many buildings constructed in the first half of the 20th century are now historic and eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, and that they may have been originally constructed with portland cement mortar.

Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic

Although specifically intended for historic buildings, the guidance is appropriate for other masonry buildings as well. This publication updates Preservation Briefs 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Brick Buildings to include all types of historic unit masonry.

Repointing Brick

Aug 15, 2012 · 2. It must also be softer than the mortar it is replacing when repointing brick or stone. This is accomplished by using less Portland Cement and more Lime and Sand. Moisture within a wall needs to escape and evaporate. Mortar that is too hard will force the moisture to escape through the softer brick or stone.

[PDF] Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry

The brief should serve as a guide to prepare specifications for repointing historic masonry. It should also help develop sensitivity to the particular needs of historic masonry, and to assist historic building owners in working cooperatively with architects, architectural conservators and historic preservation …

SPECIAL CATEGORY GRANT APPLICATION STAFF REVIEW FY 2019-2021

Specific Preservation Briefs to be called out as recommended information to consider: Preservation Brief 2 Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings Preservation Brief 9 The Repair of Historic Wooden Windows Preservation Brief 18 Rehabilitating Interiors in Historic Buildings Identifying and Preserving Character Defining Elements

Joint Repointing: Sealant vs. Mortar

Pointing joints with mortar is the most traditional method of staircase preservation. The existing mortar must be cut out to a minimum ¾” depth. During repointing, the new mortar must be tightly packed in thin layers and then tooled to a smooth concave finish. This allows the new mortar to properly bond to the staircase.

Speweik Preservation » Books

Preservation Brief 2, “Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings” Robert C. Mack, FAIA with John P. Speweik Download: {snippet}.00 – Pages 16 – Available by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Cultural Resources – Heritage Preservation Services Division, Washington, DC

Repointing – Joint Preparation

First, is the question of how deep to cut the old mortar out from the joints in preparation to receive the new replacement mortar. The Preservation Brief 2 “Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings 1998 published by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Park Service , Heritage Preservation Services gives us a good ...

Repointing mortar joints in historic masonry buildings (Part

Repointing, also known simply as "pointing" or--somewhat inaccurately--"tuck pointing," is the process of removing deteriorated mortar from the joints of a masonry wall and replacing it with new mortar. Properly done, repointing restores the visual and physical integrity of the masonry.

Preservation by Prevention What is the right way to repoint

Apr 15, 2009 · Repointing historic masonry has three critical stages, preparing the joints for work, matching the new mortar to the historic mortar, and filling the joints with new mortar. Preparing the Joints. To get the most benefit from repointing, the old mortar should be removed to a significant depth to expose sufficient bonding surfaces for the new mortar.

Mortar Joint Replacement

These steps can be found here: Preservation Briefs No. 2, “Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings”, Heritage Preservation Services, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washing-ton, D.C., October 1998. The deteriorated mortar is removed with a toothing chisel or a pointer’s grinder to a uniform depth that is usual-

Masonology

Preservation Brief 2: Repointing Mortar Joints in Historic Masonry Buildings. Preservation Briefs provide guidance on preserving, rehabilitating, and restoring ...

DNR: Preservation Briefs

Preservation Briefs are published by the National Park Service on a variety of topics in order to assist owners and developers of historic properties in recognizing and resolving common preservation and repair problems prior to initiating rehabilitation work.

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